Upcoming Body Pride: Friday February 17th

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To register, please visit: http://www.goodforher.com/body-pride-p/   or call Good For Her at (416) 588-0900.

 

Body Pride, Open for Registry

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Body Pride is a completely nude body image workshop I have been running for over three years. Each one consists of facilitated group conversation, wine, snacks and an optional dance party photoshoot! These workshops have integrally changed who I am as a person and how I relate to my body. I have learned and gained so much from every person who attends. They are really transformative, fun and beautiful evenings and I couldn’t recommend them more…

If you’d like to register, please contact Good For Her at +1 416-588-0900.

Next Body Pride

Spots are available at the next Body Pride workshop on Friday, May 22nd (7-11pm, $60)!! *There will be no cis-men at this particular one.

Body Pride is a completely nude body image workshop I have been running for over three years. Each one consists of facilitated group conversation, wine, snacks and an optional photoshoot! These workshops have integrally changed who I am as a person and how I relate to my body. I have learned and gained so much from every person who attends. They are really transformative, fun and beautiful evenings.

At 25

I turned 25 a little less than a month ago. Age is a strange and bizarre concept. At 12 I think I was older than my years. At 22 I was younger. At 25, I feel my age.

I feel my body taking longer to recover from hangovers. I feel my back getting crunchy if I don’t stretch during the day. I feel last nights bed-time french fries clinging and sticking to my insides. I feel my energy dissipating for particular sorts of interactions. My patience has both grown and completely gives no fucks when the situation calls for it.

At 25 I feel more alert to the fact that I am sharing so personally so globally. But I am struck by the ultimate goal I once had for this blog – to start a dialogue. So thrust forward I shall.

My penchant for states of mental intoxication is infrequent and often comes with a strict mandatory list of fulfillment before I can go down the road of “hey brain, you might not be back for a few hours”. My capacity for brief relationships and interactions is dwindling and I’ve come to realize how strongly I value one-on-one time with people.

At 25, I finally feel my body is my own.

When I was 19 I ordered “The Art of Seduction” online. I was ecstatic and embarrassed when it was delivered to my door. A young, awkward, and hypersexual teenager learning to seduce. Such a strange experience it was. Dolling myself up on a day-to-day basis, taking hours to pamper and dress myself before I could even leave the house. And when people would stare at me or men would hit on me, I would feel my eyes well up. Walking out of the bathroom from the Eaton Centre, a woman looked me up and down and verbally slapped me with “Well God, sorry I didn’t brush my hair this morning.”

Traveling to Scarborough for school, I would get hit on repeatedly by young men with the one liner of “Hi… Do you have a boyfriend?” and the only way I knew how to push them away was to say “Yes” and let the highly-acclaimed Male Respect wash over my new fan-base and leave me even more convinced that my body and appearance were not for myself, but for the men around me.

At 25, I know the difference. At 25 my relationships don’t change when I take my makeup off or wear sweatpants outside or get food on my face. At 25 I feel I have erased enough of this bizarre hypocritical life society expects of its young women. At 25 I have finally undone this engrained backwards thinking.

At 25, I understand how fleeting relationships can be because people are fleeting. You can never hold onto anyone because a person is not an anchor and often one has difficulty even holding onto themselves. At 25 I have learned sometimes it is ok if you don’t have enough energy to give. Some relationships are too drenched in history to unbury new kindling. Sometimes you can sit across from someone you’ve known deeply for years, and there is nothing you can say or do to resolve the personal conflicts you have both gone through together. I have been too loud to hear someone. I have been too quiet to have been heard. There is no possible way to resolve all conflict in all relationships. At 25, I am letting myself have “this is okay,” because if it’s not, I might not be able to anchor myself.

At 25, I breath deeply enough and have read enough Chopra, Mate, Tolle, Robbins, that I *hope* I can stand diplomatically and with open arms in the middle of a world that is very quick to shoot arrows and stay standing with minimal holes to my person.

At 25, I feel I have both lived 7 lives and lived none at all.

At 25, I both want to apologize to everyone I have ever unintentionally hurt and also reside in my bubble of stubborn, holding a mirror up to everyone I have fought with just so we recognize that we are just staring at ourselves. I see my own flaws so clearly in other people. I see my strengths, too.

My heart remains open, even though my head is exhausted. I sincerely appreciate and value the people in my life whose hearts are also open – it is an honor to be surrounded by friends and family who are so eager to give. I hope I am able to mirror your generosity.

At 25, I feel I have worked so hard just to go three feet forward and one foot back. And I think about all of the work that is still ahead of me and a part of me wants to lie in my bed nest with Max dog and just drink wine and fall asleep and a part of me has found the energy to keep going because passion or… something.

Here’s to my quarter-life crisis and the new sets of adventures this feeling of adult-hood will bring on.

At 30, I hope I will continue to laugh at myself.

Beauty of Brotherhood

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In December 2013, Deej and I bused up to Peterborough to do a weekend of Body Pride as per a request of my younger sister.

Peterborough’s Trent University community is incredibly unique in a numerous amount of ways – the students buy most of their groceries at the farmers market held every Saturday, transporting local produce and cheese by bike even in the dead of winter, they cook ferociously and love to share with anyone around, doors are always open, and hugs are always plentiful. It is an ideal I know many of us only dream about, and these young people have put it into action.

There was one outstanding habit that they have acquired that I am in constant awe of – the ease of touching and communication between men.

It is not unusual to see piles of girls cuddling in social situations. We chatter about our feelings and wants and desires and often cry into the armpits of our friends. This would be a rare moment to catch between men, yet these Peterborough boys have perfected it. They hug at will and talk deeply upon need. The picture above is one of many that was shot at this particular workshop, and it continues to overjoy me.  To see so much love shared between humans without the filters of stereotypical masculinity. To embrace the feminine and masculine sides of us all and stop associating it with physical gender.